How to Stay Healthy and Avoid Colds and Flu

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Now that we’re moving into what people believe is the ‘colds and flu season’ it might be wise to protect yourself with habits designed to beat those pesky little bugs back before they get a firm hold of you.

These nasty colds and flu viruses can last up to 72 hours on plastic surfaces and the even nastier norovirus can survive for two to four weeks…that’s pretty yucky.

This is the time of year we tend to travel more, so it’s a great time to be more vigilant while in confined places, like on an airplane, or in public places in general for all that shopping you’re about to get involved in!

It’s no fun if you get sick during the holidays, so here’s some avoidance techniques that should help you stay healthy and avoid the nasty colds and flu germs that could be waiting just for you.

(To learn how to manage stress and be less prone to picking up germs, click here.)

On a plane

Do a little spring cleaning on planes. Some germs thrive in dry conditions, so this is a great time to get out those hand wipes.  Make sure you carry them with you at all times and wipe down trays, seat back pockets, arm rests, in fact anything that might have been touched by someone before you.

Oh yes, and make sure you’ve sanitized your seat before going to the loo.

Too many studies have shown that airplane lavatories are teeming with nasty bugs. I often hold a wipe in my hand and use it when I have to touch something in the bathroom.

At work

Keep your hands out of the candy jar.   Germs are hiding out in those jelly beans just waiting to pounce and those maddening germs can spread around the workplace in as little as 4 hours.

Coffee machines, water coolers and all the usual suspects are likely to be buggy…it’s probably a good idea to keep those hand wipes…handy.

The doctors office

Another fine place where the bugs like to gather. 

Take your own pen with you and your own magazines, people carry the cold virus around on their hands so it’s a good idea to avoid touching what they’ve touched.

Protect yourself from sick people, be they passengers on a plane, patients in a doctor’s office or colleagues at the office. Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth.

Don’t make it easy for those nasty little germs to spread disease.

Avoiding colds and flu at home

What’s the germiest place in your home?

A study cited in both the Washington Post and USA Today articles, , found that when someone had a cold, these areas tested for cold germs about 40% of the time.

Doorknobs
Refrigerator handles
Light switches
Remote controls
Bathroom taps (known as faucets to some of us!)
Phones
Dishwasher handles
Not forgetting salt and pepper shakers (who knew?)

Everything but the kitchen sink…oh wait…the kitchen sink is a known hotbed for germs with over 500,000 bacteria a square inch in the drain.

You don’t have to drive yourself crazy with the idea of colds and flu germs hiding everywhere, ready to pounce, but taking a few preventative measures will help reduce your exposure…if you’re a believer in the season that is.

Personally, I don’t accept that idea in my life, maybe that’s why I haven’t had a cold in…who knows….something like donkey’s years!  Or maybe I’m just a lucky ducky.  Or take the appropriate precautions! 

Depends on what you believe. 🙂

Encourage one another

Love Elle

xox

ElleSommer
Elle Sommer is the author and founder of Live Purposefully Now, a website focused on sharing the insights and ancient wisdom that have collectively changed her life, in the desire to make a meaningful impact on yours. Trained at Coach U and having completed a year long training with Bob Proctor, her mission is to encourage and inspire others to build the business, relationships and life they want. Get your free instant access to Success Simplified ebook and get the tips, techniques and secrets of successfully living the life you want.
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